Connect with others who understand.

sign up log in
About myHIVteam
Real members of myHIVteam have posted questions and answers that support our community guidelines, and should not be taken as medical advice. Looking for the latest medically reviewed content by doctors and experts? Visit our resource section.

Why Aren't All The Meds The Same? Is This Virus Not The Same? Or Is It Different Mutations Of The Virus For All Of Us?

Why Aren't All The Meds The Same? Is This Virus Not The Same? Or Is It Different Mutations Of The Virus For All Of Us?

A myHIVteam Member said:

HIV medications can help lower your viral load, fight infections, and improve your quality of life. They can lower your chances of transmitting HIV, but if you take them incorrectly, you can still give HIV to others. They're not a cure for HIV.
The goals for these medicines are to:Control the growth of the virus
Improve how well your immune system works
Slow or stop symptoms
Prevent transmission of HIV to others
The FDA has approved more than two dozen antiretroviral drugs to treat HIV infection. They're often broken into six groups because they work in different ways. Doctors recommend taking a combination or "cocktail" of at least two of them. This is called antiretroviral therapy, or ART.
Your doctor will let you know specifically how you should take your medications. You need to follow the directions exactly, and you shouldn't miss even one dose. If you miss doses, you could develop drug-resistant strains of HIV, and your medication may stop working.
Some other medicines and supplements don't mix well with HIV drugs, so make sure you tell your doctor about everything you're taking.
Nucleoside/Nucleotide Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTIs)
NRTIs force the HIV virus to use faulty versions of building blocks so infected cells can't make more HIV.
Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NNRTIs)
These are also called "non-nukes." NNRTIs bind to a specific protein so the HIV virus can't make copies of itself, similar to jamming a zipper.
Protease Inhibitors (PIs)
These drugs block a protein that infected cells need to put together new HIV virus particles.
Integrase Inhibitors
These stop HIV from making copies of itself by blocking a key protein that allows the virus to put its DNA into the healthy cell's DNA. They're also called integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs).
Fusion Inhibitors unlike NRTIs, NNRTIs, PIs, and INSTIs -- which work on infected cells -- these drugs help block HIV from getting inside healthy cells in the first place.
CCR5 Antagonist
Maraviroc, or MVC (Selzentry), also stops HIV before it gets inside a healthy cell, but in a different way than fusion inhibitors. It blocks a specific kind of "hook" on the outside of certain cells so the virus can't plug in.
Post-Attachment Inhibitor or Monoclonal Antibody
This is a new class of antiviral medication specifically for adults living with HIV who have tried multiple HIV medications and whose HIV has been resistant to current available therapies. Ibalizumab-uiyk (Trogarzo) blocks your body’s HIV infected cells from spreading the virus into those which are uninfected. It is administered by IV.

posted about 2 years ago
A myHIVteam Member said:

@A myHIVteam Member men are more likely to have more advanced disease at HIV diagnosis, which is thought to put them at higher risk of adverse outcomes and less likely to respond well to ART. Some studies found that women had higher CD4 cell count at ART initiation than men.

posted about 2 years ago
A myHIVteam Member said:

There are two types of HIV, there is what is called hiv-1 and another one called hiv-2. Hiv-1 is more prevalent in North Americans and Europeans hiv-2 is more prevalent in African-Americans or people living in Africa. of those two strains those streets can be broken down into even more strains.

posted about 2 years ago
A myHIVteam Member said:

No, it's just like a generic brand of aspirin versus Bayer.... Different pharmaceutical companies have launched their antivirals. Along with the fact that different people respond to ARTs in a different way... what works for you may not necessarily work for your husband ,...depending on the strain and his DNA.. I've attached the drug chart for you. Thanks for the question.🤗🤗🤗. https://www.poz.com/article/2019-hiv-drug-chart

edited, originally posted about 2 years ago
A myHIVteam Member said:

@A myHIVteam Member you should ask your doctor to give you a resistance test it just might be the regimine you are on. With this test they can see what is the best treatment for you

posted about 2 years ago
Already a Member? Log in